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RECYCLER SAATHI: INCULCATING BETTER RECYCLING SOLUTIONS

By Creasion
Jan 14, 2020

The United Nations claims that there are 51 trillion microplastics in the sea, which is 500 times more than stars in the galaxy. This data is an apt representation of the rising problem of plastics that is evidently only getting worse. With growing consumerism and commercialization, it would not be wrong to say that plastics have become an inseparable part of human life. From the food that we consume to the products that we use, all of it comes to us packaged in some or the other forms of plastic. This overt dependence of humans to plastics has increased to the point that it has become an indispensable part of our lifestyle today. With time and with increasing materialism, the use of plastic has gone so much out of hand that what was considered a blessing has become a massive curse today. Plastic waste has been feared as much as climate change and the repercussions of global warming. Out of the various forms of plastic pollution, managing Polyethylene Terephthalate (PET) Plastic Waste is a challenge. Although PET bottles are highly recyclable, most of them ends up as waste eventually resulting in massive pollution. It is estimated that by 2021, over 500 billion PET bottles will be produced. Similarly, out of the almost 500 billion productions of PET bottles in 2016, less than half of it was recycled. If the production and consumption of these bottles continue at the expected number with the recycling rate stagnant, their impact only seems to aggravate more. Plastic pollution is a global problem and Nepal is no exception to it. With the increasing purchasing power of people, their demands have also grown. This, in turn, has fostered the culture of consumerism and added to the problem of growing plastic and plastic related productions. It is reported that on average, 100 million plastic bags are consumed in a month in Kathmandu alone. Out of the total urban waste generated in Kathmandu, 16 percent is occupied by plastic waste which implies that 2.7 tonnes of plastic waste are generated daily. The statistics point to the magnitude of plastic pollution in Nepal. Even within plastic pollution, the generation of waste PET bottles is a serious but often neglected issue.   According to a report by GIZ, there are 52 PET bottle manufacturing industries in Nepal that produce 24000 tons of PET bottles annually. To cater to the waste PET bottles produced by these manufacturing industries, there are only 2 small scale recycling centers. Further, it has been reported that 15000 tons of waste PET bottles are generated in Nepal and out of this number, 10-12000 tons of it are illegally exported to Nepal. While the level of awareness among people about the proper disposal of plastic bottles and the culture of reusing it is almost bleak, the waste management mechanism is not impressive either. To cater to the failed waste management and recycling mechanism of Nepal, Recycler Saathi, an initiative of CREASION has been introduced as a first of its kind project that legally exports waste bottles to India through Essel Industries Pvt Ltd., the Nepal unit of the Ganesha Ecosphere Ltd., India. Based on Public-Private Partnership (PPP) model, the project is supported by Coca Cola Foundation and Bottlers Nepal (Terai) Ltd. The waste PET bottles bought from private companies and NGOs like Green Nepal City Waste Management Himalayan Climate Initiative (HCI) will be sent to the Nepal unit of Ganesha Ecosphere Ltd. in Nawalparasi after baling, which will then be exported legally to India. While the effort will definitely organize the waste sector of Nepal and help in the formation of a legal means to monetize waste PET bottles, it will also substantially help reduce carbon emissions. Recycling 1 ton of PET reduces 1.5 tonnes of carbon emissions which implies that with the target recycling of 3125 tonnes of PET, 4688 tonnes of carbon emissions can be reduced. Carbon dioxide as a greenhouse gas traps excessive heat and contributes to the increasing problem of global warming which has damaging impacts on the environment and human life. Hence, the impact of the project is not just received on a macro level but also on a micro-level through the minimization of carbon emissions. The major beneficiaries of the Recycler Saathi project are the informal waste collectors. These door- to- door waste collectors are not guaranteed adequate incentives or respect for the work that they carry out due to the negligence to the waste sector of the country. Recycler Saathi aims to integrate these waste workers into its project by providing them better employment opportunities and social security. The long term vision of the project is to make them capable enough to start their own recycling company that would assist the entire recycling mechanism of the country. Further, the families of the waste workers will also be provided with trainings and skills development classes so that the overall quality of life of the families can be improved for the better. Waste collectors are one of the major players in the war against the mounting environmental pressure created by the increasing activities of humans. The major idea behind the project is to create an organized network of waste workers who are well respected and feel a sense of ownership of the work they do and the purpose that it serves. To provide better services to the waste workers and to improve and organize their working conditions, Recycler Saathi also has plans to tie up with Alliance for Indian Waste Pickers who have already been working in the same sector with the assistance of the Indian government. In addition, Recycler Saathi has already started a supporting project- Waste Smart Club to complement its objective of creating a better recycling culture. Waste Smart Club, created in five different schools of Chitwan engages students in various eco- friendly activities with the purpose of creating a generation of young people who care for the environment.   Hence, Recycler Saathi is a project with a sustainable vision of gradually improving and strengthening the waste sector of Nepal. It not only focuses on the bigger picture but prioritizes all the key players in the waste management sector. The successful implementation of the project guarantees a breakthrough in the recycling business of Nepal along with the benefits shared by not just the environment but the economic and social factors of Nepal as well. With constant and unwavering support from the concerned stakeholders, the outcome envisioned by Recycler Saathi will definitely be achieved for the greater good of the country and the environment.

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GENDER INCLUSION IN CLIMATE CHANGE ADAPTABILITY

By Creasion
Dec 13, 2019

The divide between men and women can be seen and experienced in almost everything. Socialization has a crucial role in creating and deepening these discrepancies across genders. Women have mostly been disadvantaged due to systemic oppression and societal barriers that they face in everyday life. Their role in different fields is scrutinized and dictated by various factors- physical, psychological, cultural, social and economic. As a result of various vulnerabilities that they experience, women have become primary victims of climate change and climate change-induced risks and disasters. The underrepresentation of women in various arenas, multiple work burden imposed upon them along with lack of accessibility of resources, education and job opportunities are major reasons why women have become the prime targets of climate change. Climate change impacts on women can emanate in various forms- from agricultural unproductivity, increased work burden, diseases and health to disaster-induced risks and death. With the emergence of the global climate crisis as an issue that is well and fine in front of our sight, climate-induced disasters are no strangers to the world. The United Nations estimates that 80% of people displaced by climate are women. Records show African American women were among the worst affected by flooding after Hurricane Katrina in 2005; 2004 Tsunami in Srilanka, India, and Indonesia saw a vast distinction in the survival of men as compared to woman by 3:1 ratio; 1991 cyclone and flood resulted in five times higher death rate of women than men; more women died during the 2003 heatwave in Europe. The trend of higher death rates of women than men as a result of climate-induced disasters indicates the vulnerability of women. Research suggests that women and children are 14 times more likely to die in a disaster than men. Their supposed obligation to their families and the need to protect them first from disasters puts women in a disadvantaged position ultimately resulting in their death. Further, the sexualization of women’s bodies from an early age and a feeling of shame imposed upon them also refrains women from being rescued from disasters. Similar reasons resulted in the death of many women during the 2018 Kerala flooding. Since the massive inflow of water had deranged the clothing of women, they were adamant to be rescued due to the shame of being exposed in that way in front of people. Such rigid socialization and cultural barriers imposed upon women eventually led them to choose death. Not just death, but post-disaster repercussions for women are also severe. As women mostly act as caretakers of the household and families who do most of the household chores, their exposure to disaster-induced risks is greater. Especially during instances of drought and flood women are forced to travel long distances to fetch water which makes them physically, mentally and emotionally vulnerable. Moreover, the risks increase in emergency shelters where they become victims of sexual assaults, rape, and violence. Further, a report also states that divorced women face more scrutiny during disaster events and are not allowed relief materials post-disaster due to their failure to establish a legal identity for themselves. While various reasons exist behind women being highly jeopardized by climate change, the failure to include them in climate change adaptation measures is a grave mistake that we must overcome. Policies, plans, and programs cannot be implemented for combating climate change without including women- who include half of the world- in decision making. A report on Women and the Environment from the European Institute for Gender Equality states that women and men think differently about climate change solutions. While women agree on changing their daily habits to reduce effects of climate change, men seek for higher alternatives such as the use of electric cars, nuclear energy as an alternative source of energy ­­­­ and a higher energy tax. Women tend to bring empathy and inclusiveness in their decisions which results in a more sustainable outcome. The measures that women agree on controlling the effects of climate change are more realistic, doable and convenient. To mitigate the impact of climate change on women, it is important to include them in core decision making through different channels. The average representation of women in national and global climate negotiating bodies is below 30% which is a disappointing figure. Without the involvement of women, a gendered perspective on climate change and climate change policies cannot be achieved and implemented. The EU states that the failure in including gender dimension in climate justice is due to the fact that women are underrepresented in climate change policymaking and negotiations as representatives of government and civil society organizations. The knowledge and experience of local women from developing countries are equally instrumental in proposing and implementing sustainable solutions to combat climate change. Although women have been portrayed as the victims of climate change if provided the right avenue, opportunity, and platform they can become agents of change. In rural communities, women act as the managers of natural resources and they understand the sensitivity of the environmental issues leading up to climate change. For example, a local community under the leadership of a woman named Constance in Uganda reduced their community’s impact on the environment through replanting trees they once cut down for firewood. The new roots of mango, orange, avocado trees were useful in preventing soil from washing away in flood. As a result, the community experienced less damage from floods and could prevent food scarcity. The local knowledge and experience that women possess must be imperatively considered while framing national and international policies and guidelines against climate change. Therefore, climate change has become a gendered issue today. Gender mainstreaming of climate change policies is required to have a more balanced approach to the issue and combat its repercussions. For this purpose, bringing women to the table, having their voices heard and materializing their experience and knowledge is crucial.

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Youth for Climate

By Avipsha Rayamajhi
Nov 21, 2019

Most baby boomers refuse to believe that climate change exists. Millennials are scared climate change is going to be the death of them. Amidst this tussle of ideologies over the legitimacy of the issue, the one who is suffering the most is our earth. Climate change is real. Denial is no solution to the fact that the world around us, the earth that we live in is in a dire state. The hard-hitting impacts of climate change might not be felt from our high- rise buildings and air-conditioned rooms, but that does not imply the problem is negligible. Time and again, the world has been reminded of the magnitude of climate change. The recent tornado in Bara of Nepal, Cyclone Fani in India, series of frequent hurricanes in the United States of America are evidence that this is a global phenomenon and one that does not discriminate- the repercussions having spread over third- world to first- world countries. Yet, world leaders and the ones with the power to influence have shown bleak sense of urgency towards the issue. Despite a range of massively fancy conferences and treaties over the years, the problem has not been adequately addressed. The youth of today, however, have emerged as the real champions of climate change. They realize the gravity of the problem and are not willing to stay as silent spectators to the chaos that climate change has evoked. They rebel, they protest, they call out world leaders, adopt a more sustainable approach to daily activities and most importantly do not fear to occupy space. They lead by example and constantly remind big corporations and leaders that our future is in danger and quick action is imperative. The activism shown by youth all around the world for climate change has been exemplary. Global Climate Strike is one such initiative led by Greta Thunberg, a 16-year old Swedish school student. What emanated as Thunberg’s symbolic absence from school to protest against climate change in front of the Swedish Parliament gained a huge momentum and has led to a global alliance of youth pressurizing big corporations and leaders to take immediate action for climate crisis. The wave of solidarity among youth has also reached Nepal. A silent rally in support of Thunberg’s global movement was conducted in May in Nepal by CREASION. Further, Nepal Youth Environment Coalition (NYEC) formed by the active volunteers of CREASION along with students of environment science of various colleges brings together environmentally conscious youth with the zeal to work towards the environment and various environment-related issues. The youth group has been actively organizing discussions and interaction programs to integrate a larger network of young people from various walks of life in climate-related dialogues. Hamro Pariyavaran is a talk show by NYEC that brings into light different national and international climate issues through interactions with climate activists and workers. Similarly, a recent session on Climate Interactive Tools with Dr. Bindu Bhandari was a first of its kind climate-related event held in Nepal which worked on Model United Nations approach and emphasized on solving climate-related issues. The workshop divided the participants into different groups known as ‘committees’ who were then assigned the responsibility to provide strategies to cope up with certain climate issues. All the different committees had to reconcile at a strategy that would help meet the agenda. Such workshops are an innovative way to engage youth in problem-solving and generate ideas through mutual understanding and consideration of each other’s positions. Considering the usefulness of this workshop to youth, NYEC also plans to take it throughout Nepal. Highway Clean-Up Campaign is another project in CREASION’s pipeline. With a waste collection of the area between Thankot and Chitwan by engaging local volunteers, the campaign aims to instigate in locals the need for proper disposal of waste- mainly plastics and plastic bottles. Besides, the engagement of youth in the campaign is a good way to integrate them in the movement towards a healthier environment. The long term vision of the campaign is the creation of a golden triangle and expansion of the highway clean- up campaign. NYEC also plans the expansion of their chapters in the ten different locations- Thankot, Naubise, Mahadev Besi, Benighat, Galchi, Gajuri, Malekhu, Mugling, Ramnagar, Narayanghat- that are set for the campaign to form an alliance of like-minded and environmentally conscious youth. Recycler Saathi project that is underway to manage and formalize the waste management sector of Nepal is also beneficial for the environment.   Despite the magnitude and the seriousness of climate change, one encouraging thing that has come out of it is the enthusiasm shown by youth around the world to right the wrongs done to the environment. The level of commitment, amount of care and intensity of passion shown by youth for the environment and to fight climate change is commendable. Such multiple efforts by CREASION to give youth an organized direction and platforms to interact about the sensitive issues of climate change are important and necessary. Youth have the power, understanding, and enthusiasm but they require the right guidance, institutional support and conducive environment to foster and materialize their concern towards climate change. Hence, youth hold the power to bring change and with the enthusiasm that they have, it is likely that they will take the lead in the fight against climate change.

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CIRCULAR ECONOMY: THE SOLUTION TO SUSTAINABILITY

By Avipsha Rayamajhi
Nov 10, 2019

Have you ever wondered about the possibility of your ready- to- throw soda bottles transform into a completely new product? A brand new t-shirt, fleece jackets, sleeping bags, carpets or more bottles perhaps? While the concept of plastic transforming into a completely new product almost seems like a miracle, it is possible and already thriving. You can easily obtain a brand new t-shirt from 10 plastic bottles, a sweater from 63 plastic bottles and a sleeping bag from 114 plastic bottles! Amazing, right? Not just the bottle, but the cap can also be transformed into batteries, storage containers, ropes, brooms, shopping bags, and whatnot. All of this is derived from the outcome of a simple yet important concept of Circular Economy (CE). The concept of the Circular Economy focuses on the regenerative designing of products that would enable continued use of it. Basically, it aims to retain the quality and usability of products for a longer period of time. It entails closing the loop so that the functionality of resources is restored and waste is kept minimal. The current trend of the linear economy works on the culture of use and dispose. The idea behind the circular economy primarily emanated as an antithesis to the linear economy and is derived from the relationship between natural resources and the economy. Economy is fueled by natural resources but the same economic activity eventually creates negative repercussions for the environment by unnecessary waste production. Circular economy intends to form an ecosystem that thrives on long- term use and sustainable quality- one that retains the use of natural resources and reduces waste. Although the concept traces its history from different sources, one of the pioneers of CE can be taken as Boulding who opposed the practice of the existing linear economy and termed it as unsustainable owing to the limitations of the natural system. He introduced the concept of ‘Spaceman Economy’ is contrary to the ‘Cowboy Economy’ and popularised the idea of a closed system with looped resources. Another complementing concept to CE is the Cradle- to- Cradle theory developed by American Architect William McDonough which draws its inspiration from nature. A plant takes up nutrients from the soil, grows and provides nutrients to the surrounding soil from its scattered leaves. It basically works on the principle of the natural system where nothing goes to waste and is circled around for use. The theory has taken reference from biological metabolism and developed the concept of technical metabolism. It considers the inputs or raw materials used in production as ‘nutrients’ which must be returned back to its source for greater efficiency. Here, nothing is taken as waste but rather ‘nutrients’ with the possibility of further use. The theory in line with the concept of circular economy aims to put an end to waste and make resources part of a closed system.   The human civilization and the environment are presently at the helm of mounting plastic pollution. The growing trend of consumerism has fostered throwaway culture. People consume all they can and if they do not require them anymore, there is no hesitation to dump it- ignorant of the massive repercussions of their actions to the environment. To tackle this problem, circular economy can emerge as a relevant solution. Businesses and manufacturers need to revise their business model and make it more sustainable by planning the entire life cycle of their products so that it does not end up in landfills as waste. Recycler Saathi, an initiation of CREASION is a good addition to the increasing culture of circularity in Nepal. The ongoing project aims to refrain PET plastic bottles from ending up in landfill as waste by forming a legal channel for their export. The PET bottles are collected, baled, reduced to flakes and then legally exported to India for repurposing. While the environmental benefit is the primary highlight of the initiative, the economic and social impact is equally noteworthy. Since the PET bottles are legally exported, revenue generation is higher which eventually increases the living standard of waste workers, our Recycler Saathis. In this way, resources after use are not labelled as waste but rather attain a second life and shuffle along the same system. This cuts the production cost of new PET bottles provides better and enhanced employment opportunities for more people and also cuts off unnecessary costs and hassle of managing waste that does not belong to the landfill. The recycling of PET bottles in this way is a win-win for circular economy since it contributes to improving the overall efficiency of the entire socio-economic and environmental system. While initiatives like Recycler Saathi contribute a great deal in the institutionalising circular economy- which is the need of the hour- the baton must also be carried by manufacturers and ensure the supply chain of products inclines to the principle of the circular economy. Similarly, consumers also play an important part in taking responsibility of their actions and being mindful of their patterns of consumption. In this way, ensuring the system adheres to circular economy requires the effort of not just one party but a joint collaboration of various parties involved- be it consumers, producers or third party organizations. Hence, in the wake of increasing environmental problems, growing population, and skyrocketing industrialization it is crucial to consider and modify how we approach our everyday activities. Transitioning to a circular economy can prevent our failing economic and environmental state from collapsing and contribute to the world’s vision of sustainable development.    

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Winning Poem of POETRY COMPETITION (IYD 2018) - धनबहादुर उपाध्यय

By Saurav Luitel
Aug 12, 2018

सरकार,म धनबहादुर उपाध्यय,वर्ष २६, M.Sc. Ag गरि आएको छु,स्वाभिमानको पसिना खान नसकेर,तिसौं हजार खर्च गरिGRE, TOEFL गरि आएको छु,हजुर सरकार, मलाई अमेरिका पठाइदेउ !मलाई अमेरिका पठाइदेउ !! म बाँच्दै गर्दा म भित्रको ‘म’ मर्यो भनेम बाँचे के/नबाँचे के सरकार ?म गल्दैछु, यहाँ मलाई मर्न नदेउ,बरु मलाई बेचिदेउ !हजुर सरकार मलाई अमेरिका पठाइदेउ ! संगै पढेका एक हुल साथिहरुउहिल्यै अमेरिका पुगिसके,साथिहरु डलरमा ‘रकम’ कमाउँछन,र रकममा ‘इज्जत’ कमाउँछन ! गाउँभरी हल्ला चलिरहन्छ,साथिभाइले PR पाएको कुरातीनका बा-आमाले खबर पाउँदासबेरै झिसमिसे हुन्छ,डाँडाको बिचमा उदेकलाग्दो भएर उभिएकोसुर्य पनि एक्कासि यस्तो खबरलेअनुहारमा अद्भूत मुस्कान निर्धक्क बोकेरउनका आगनमा उभिन्छर छेक्नेगर्छ मेरो घरको उज्यालो !घामै नउदाउने घरमा बसेर गर्नु के/नगर्नु के सरकार ?त्यसैले, बिन्ती मलाई अमेरिकि भिसा लगाइदेउ ! दिनभरि खेतमा काम गरि आएकोकिसानको हिलोले खाएको औंलाको काप हेर्दा लाग्छ,खुट्टा भनेको देश हो,अनि कापका घाउ तिमि हौ सरकारहामी किसान त हिलो खाने गर्छौं ,अनि घाउ खुट्टा खाने गर्छ ! लाग्थ्यो,मेरि आमा खुसीको चामल पकाउँथिन,म पसिना सग भात निल्थेबा-आमा मलाई हेरेर खुशी निल्थे ! तर, होइन रहेछ, खुशी हुन त,अमेरिकी विश्वविद्यालयको एसेप्टेन्स लेटर चाहिने रहेछ,खुशी हुन त, हातमा अमेरिकी भिसा र टिकट हुनुपर्दो रहेछ ! खैर, सरकार तक्दिर न होम फर्किउँला/नफर्किउँलायो कुरा यहीँ थाती छाडौंअहिलेलाई, अमेरिका जान नसकेको भन्दैममाथी कमजोर, नालायक व्यक्ति हुँ भनेरसमाजले लान्छना लगाउन अघिमलाई अमेरिका पठाइदेउ !स्कुल देखि विश्वविद्यालयसम्म विदेश जानेयोग्य युवायुवती निस्कने कारखानाबाट तयार भएको मयदि विदेश नै गइदिन भने तिमीलाई समेत अयोग्य भनीयो समाज ठहर्‍याउँन सक्छ !त्यसैले सरकार मलाई अमेरिका पठाइदेउ !बिन्ती सरकार अहिलेलाइ अमेरिकी भिजा लगाइदेउ !!!!! धनबहादुर उपाध्यय

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WHAT IS A STRENGTH TO YOU?

By Lunswan Tuladhar
Nov 23, 2017

Is strength holding on when there’s nothing to hold on to? Or is it letting it out for what it is? Or is it expression in the form that makes you feel relieved? Or is it a physical release or exercise of some sort? For me, it is many things. It is me trying to deal with it on my own first. If I fail, then strength means accepting that I am a human and that I can’t keep it altogether all the time. Then I ask for help from my people and my surroundings. That is something I call real courage because for me, asking for help is very difficult. But sometimes, my people aren’t around. And not letting myself be down at the moment is a strength for me. And not letting a guard build up because of it is a strength for me. Think about it, how do you forget all the good things because of this one unfortunate thing? Is it even fair? But on second thoughts, don’t you stop asking for help because this let down one person at a time, builds a wall in you? This train of thoughts is exactly what I conquer, though this process is always a work of improvisation, and is always going on. This is a strength for me. Training my brain to give a chance to people because they are humans is a strength for me. They are humans and so are you. They can make mistakes and so can you. You try and you fail. You fail and you try again, that is how you get up and learn. Being able to practice this is a strength for me. Being able to decide that I will be the better one, no matter how superficial it appears to be is a strength for me. Because at the end of the day, being able to take care of what I require, how I require it, as I balance what is appropriate and what is okay to let go of; isn’t that what builds you? Isn’t that what strength is? So, what makes YOU strong?

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THIS IS WHY YOU SHOULD BE EXPRESSIVE

By Lunswan Tuladhar
Oct 31, 2017

Have you ever been called inexpressive? Has anyone ever told you to be more open about your feelings? Has anyone confessed to you how you don’t show as much as love you say you have? Why you ask? Because feeling it isn’t enough. Feeling that they are loved sometimes isn’t enough, infact, is better when expressed. Because time is not as much as you think is there. That is why, before it gets too late, tell your loved ones how much you value them. Before time and death does you apart, tell them. Remember, these two can’t be reversed. And also remember, all the things you never said will break your heart first, then haunt you forever. They know, so why stress it out so much? Because hearing love in words does magic. The magic that brings faith back and strengthens it. Because hearing love makes you believe you a bit more. The world is lacking energy and love, and expression of it can bring so much of it. Don’t you think so? Get yourself over it and express it as much as you can. Because faith has an expiration date. Even if it didn’t, you shouldn’t take those who you love for granted. You shouldn’t push this person to the point that their faith gives up on them. Yes, FAITH gives up on people. Faith comes above actions. Inactions breed fear. Do you want someone you love fear and question everything that you say you give to them? Do you even love them? If you did, you wouldn’t let them go through this. They are going through this and they are going through it silently. They need to hear this so that they can tell themselves that faith had been restored. Ask yourself, haven’t you ever felt like giving someone a chance who says no to action? Do you deserve that? Now that you have the answer, ask yourself again. Would you like to feel that? So should you be doing this to someone else? Don’t avoid things because they are too hard to handle. Because, maybe, you won’t get a second chance. Don’t let your faith upon a second chance get away. ‘Cause when you lose something that had a place in your heart, you get lost. Don’t lose yourself. Expression matters. It helps. It becomes an energy

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STATE OF YOUTH IN NEPAL

By Ayasma Tuladhar
Aug 08, 2016

I thought I’d write about youths since its International Youth Day on August 12, Friday. We youths have tremendous capacity and the willingness to empower. Primarily, in this day and age of the internet, social media plays a significant role in the participation of youths for social work. People have more information about the different programs going on around them through Facebook events and Instagram posts. This leads to more participation in such events. I mean everybody must have heard of/gone to at least one cycle rally, flash mob, fundraising program or even blood donations done by various organizations for different issues prevalent in the society. However, in spite of the advances in youth participation, there is a setback in the development of the country as a whole because of high migration rates. Relatively larger proportions of the overall migration population are young migrants. All our efforts are being wasted abroad as we are losing young and able human resources as well as highly skilled workers. The lack of education, as well as job opportunities in Nepal, will indefinitely lead to youths lacking the motivation to study here or come back from studying abroad to work here. Nonetheless, that’s for the lucky ones who do get the opportunity to go abroad. There are so many youths who don’t get to go to school due to extreme poverty. As a result of the lack of investment in education and health sectors and the political instability of our country, there are still so many capable youths who don’t even get an opportunity to realize their potential. The condition of our country has relatively improved but we have a long way to go as so many people are still living below the poverty level in dire conditions. Specifically, after the devastating earthquake and the recent floods and landslides, so many people have been displaced, their houses destroyed and lives lost. This might sound very cliché but we are the leaders of tomorrow and it is us who make Nepal greater. We were nourished in this very country for so many years and it’s our duty to give back what little we can. Youths who do go abroad should come back and try to create opportunities lacking in this country because our country needs our help now more than ever.

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YOUTH AND EMPLOYMENT

By Creasion
Jul 21, 2016

Have you ever tried to find a place where you can take your first step into knowing how working actually feels like? Some place where you can gather handfuls of experiences which will help you later in life; but the only offers you see are the ones where you already need a certain amount of experience. If the only opportunities available are the ones that require a minimum “some time” worth of experience, where and how do you ever start? The term “youth” may differ from country to country, as for Nepal the ages ranging from 15-29 are considered as youths. If we follow this definition we come up with the fact that about 30% of the entire population consists of youths. That is nearly half of the economically independent population. One of the main reasons that pushes youths towards unemployment is poverty and lack of proper education which forces them to start working from an early age. These problems mostly are seen in the rural areas. Whatever the condition maybe, if anyone starts working from a young age they will not have enough time to gain the right amount of skills to get good jobs and will have to work mostly at places which give the opportunity for labor work. As for the more developed areas of the country the main problem seems to be that there are too many people who are skilled, resulting in unemployment as well as underemployment. Not everyone will be able to find a job or an opportunity which would be suitable for their abilities. Making it one of the greatest reasons why majority of the youths decide to go abroad and stay there, without a second thought to ever return. It’s a shame to see the future of our country either settling for 3D jobs or staying unemployed because they cannot find any place which would help them flourish. There are so many ways in which our country can choose to develop and so many areas they can find to work on. Wouldn’t it be amazing if those parts of our country weren’t overlooked and were actually dealt with? So why not take the initiative to make our country better. Even when we decide to study abroad, why not come back and start something on your own. Even though it is scary, the shot maybe definitely worth it.

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Debunking Myths: Episode II

By Creasion
Feb 24, 2016

It could’ve been a disaster, it could’ve been the first yet final nail on the coffin of Debunking Myths. “Great program. Can’t wait for the next episode.”“The program was powerful and thought-invoking, everything we’d hoped for it to be and more.”“A great kick-start to the series. Can’t wait for more to come.” Only it wasn’t. This was the reaction we received from the audience, who were much more involved during the debate session than we could’ve hoped for. But of course, we didn’t know where we’d end up when we started. A few hours prior to the event, one of our keynote speakers had cancelled because of an injury she picked up during an unfortunate accident. Well. I panicked. I raced back and forth, up and down, around circles trying to untangle the million knots the news had tied around my brain. A little while and a couple hundred steps later, I drew a couple different scenarios in my head to play the program out as one of the best cases. First thing to do: Confirm the presence of the other keynote speakers a final time. Second thing: Divide the rest of my fellow volunteers into groups to take care of each detail in the program. Third thing to do: Breathe. We’d finally finished setting up. Only that we hadn’t. 12 on the clock and one more hour to go until our audience started arriving. Panic time again? Not really. Between trying to set up the camera in the perfect place and asking the other volunteers to not make a mess of the room they themselves had just cleaned, and trying to arrange seats, and then taking calls from the attendees, panic? Maybe later. I’d already felt myself getting a little under the weather at this point, and by the time we were ready to welcome our keynote speakers and begin the program, I knew I was running a fever. No matter though, because Bhushita Didi helped do much of the work from here. As we tried to balance and coordinate the mediator role, the program begun with our address to the audience regarding what Debunking Myths stands for, and what we look to achieve. The idea is simple, really. Gather, have a few well experienced personalities speak on the topic, and debunk some popular myths in our society, and then move on to a debate session where the audience reveals some of the myths they’ve brought and we discuss a way on how to tackle it. Simple. Mr. Pradip Giri started us off as he explored the ancient myths of our culture and how they still dominate our image of women. For the 15 minutes that he was given, he went about exercising the audience’s minds regarding the topic before he handed over his spotlight to Miss Samjhana Phuyal. Samjhana ji had an intensively thorough presentation, and her own experience revolving around the myths of sexual harassment to share with us. As Pradip ji had done before, she tried to involve the crowd and make it feel as though it was a great place to share, and it was. At the end of our keynote session, during, and even after the debate session were a flurry of raised hands one after another wishing to challenge the myths of today and share their own share of stories regarding right violations. All in all, it was and a success. It really was, given the short space of time the team had gotten to work around the obstacles. We hope the next episode of Debunking Myths is an improvement on this. No. We know it will be.

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CLIMATE CHANGE: HOW IT AFFECTS NEPAL

By CREASION
Jan 08, 2015

One might be forgiven for thinking that the International Summit being held in Paris concerns the terrorist situation that is ISIS, the discussions being held are for a problem that has been extant long before the terrorist organisation had taken its first steps. Climate Change has been an inexorable wave that has been tailing us since the 19th Century, and even though it has been the topic for much debate and even more research, a one-size-fits-all solution hasn’t yet been promulgated. While in fact, one-size-should-fit-all is what should be put in play at the moment, it hasn’t been a very popular idea- despite the gravity of the situation. With the COP 21: Climate Summit in Paris finally edging towards a deal to reduce (notice how it’s reduced and not reverse) the effects of industrialisation, some of the key arguments being made for and against a worldwide overhaul, highlight the different perspectives and understandings of the situation as people see it. Some think that there are more taxing matters waiting to be dealt first, some think that it’s unfair on developing countries that they need to cut down on their use of fossil fuels, others mainly support the idea of change, but are unsure of its extent. But let’s get to the main questions the article is trying to ask in the context of our own environment: Where does Nepal stand in this, and if the answer isn’t so straightforward- Where should Nepal stand in the face of Climate Change? Nepal, being one of the most climate-vulnerable mountain LDC, has been actively engaging itself in implementing actions to adapt to the changing climate, as well as leading from the front as a Chair of the LDC Coordination Group, for 2013, and 2014. According to Eco Experts, a group focused on following, and trying to limit -if not reverse- Global Warming, Nepal’s Green House Gas emission is less than 0.027 percent of the total global emission, it doesn’t have much to contribute in the way of limiting the effects of changing climate, but rather should brace itself, and has been doing all it can to try to adapt. For this, Nepal steady itself, because as stated earlier, we are vulnerable, and studies have shown that though Nepal might not turn into another Venice just yet as the situation in Venice is grave and Nepal is far cry from facing such situation, if the temperature continues to rise by 2°C, by 2050 water availability will be too low to produce our own food. Life might seem grinding without fuel, but try living without food. So then, another question arises: are we doing enough or is it all just show? Well, that is for you to decide, because the contribution of each individual living in a country matters if they are to truly adapt to the harsh changes in lifestyle we might need to brace ourselves for.    Remember, only we can be our own saviors.   Picture source: Source: https://www.flickr.com/photos/tbrittaine/11907391365

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